A new assistive device for intermittent self-catheterization in men with tetraplegia.

The journal of spinal cord medicine

PubMedID: 12828294

Adler US, Kirshblum SC. A new assistive device for intermittent self-catheterization in men with tetraplegia. J Spinal Cord Med. 2003;26(2):155-8.
OBJECTIVE
To evaluate whether a new assistive device, the HouseHold (Flexlife Medical, Kingwood, Tex), allows for independent, clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) in a population of individuals with tetraplegia who were previously unable to perform catheterization independently.

DESIGN
Before-and-after trial with 1-month follow-up.

SETTING
A free-standing spinal cord rehabilitation hospital.

PATIENTS
Data were collected from 9 men with traumatic spinal cord injury, motor levels C5 through C7, who were unable to perform CIC independently.

INTERVENTION
Each individual was instructed in the proper technique for CIC with the aid of the Household.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENT
The ability to perform CIC with the Household.

RESULTS
With the aid of the HouseHold, all participants were able to perform all aspects of CIC independently within 5 minutes on their first attempt. All participants were satisfied with the comfort and ease of use of the HouseHold. At 1-month follow-up, all continued to use the HouseHold for CIC, except for 1 individual who regained sufficient hand function to allow for independence in CIC without an assistive device.

CONCLUSION
The HouseHold device offers an easily learned means for intermittent self-catheterization in a subgroup of persons with tetraplegia who otherwise would require an alternative method of neurogenic bladder management.