Self-reported personality traits and disorders (DSM-IV) and risk of criminal recidivism: a prospective study.

Journal of personality disorders

PubMedID: 14521178

Hiscoke UL, Långström N, Ottosson H, Grann M. Self-reported personality traits and disorders (DSM-IV) and risk of criminal recidivism: a prospective study. J Pers Disord. 2003;17(4):293-305.
Assessment and management of criminal offenders require valid methods to recognize personality psychopathology and other risk and protective factors for recidivism. We prospectively explored the association between dimensional and categorical measures of personality disorder (PD) measured with the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Questionnaire (DIP-Q, Ottosson et al., 1995) and registered reconvictions in adult offenders. One hundred and sixty-eight offenders consecutively referred for pre-sentencing forensic psychiatric evaluation in Sweden during 1995-1996 completed DIP-Q self-reports. The subjects received different types of sanctions and were followed for an average of 36 months after release from prison, discharge from a forensic psychiatric hospital, or onset of nondetaining sentences. Age-adjusted odds ratios revealed a 4.8 times higher risk for any recidivism and a 3.7 times higher risk for violent recidivism among subjects whose self-reports suggested a categorical diagnosis of antisocial PD as compared to offenders without antisocial PD. The remaining nine categorical DSM-IV PD diagnoses were not significantly related to recidivism. In dimensional analyses, each additional antisocial and schizoid PD symptom endorsed by participants at baseline increased the risk for violent reoffending. Our results suggest a relationship between self-reported behavioral instability and interpersonal dysfunction captured primarily by DSM-IV antisocial and schizoid PD constructs, and criminal re-offending also in a multi-problem sample of identified offenders.