Mechanical stress stimulates phospholipase C activity and intracellular calcium ion levels in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

Cell calcium

PubMedID: 11162845

Ruwhof C, van Wamel JT, Noordzij LA, Aydin S, Harper JC, van Der Laarse A. Mechanical stress stimulates phospholipase C activity and intracellular calcium ion levels in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Cell Calcium. 2001;29(2):73-83.
To investigate how mechanical stress is sensed by cardiomyocytes and translated to cardiac hypertrophy, cardiomyocytes were subjected to stretch while measuring phospholipase C (PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD) activities and levels of intracellular calcium ions ([Ca2+]i) and pH. In stretched cardiomyocytes, PLC activity increased 2-fold after 30 min, whereas PLD activity hardly increased at all. Mechanical stress induced by prodding or by cell stretch increased [Ca2+](i)by a factor 5.2 and 4, respectively. Gadolinium chloride (stretch-activated channel blocker) attenuated the prodding-induced and stretch-induced [Ca2+](i)rise by about 50%. Blockade of ryanodine receptors by a combination of Ruthenium Red and procaine reduced the [Ca2+](i)rise only partially. Diltiazem (L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist) blocked the prodding-induced [Ca2+](i)rise completely, and reduced the stretch-induced [Ca2+](i)rise by about 50%. The stretch-induced [Ca2+](i)rise was unaffected by U73122, an inhibitor of PLC activity. Stretch did not cause cellular alkalinization. In conclusion, in cardiomyocytes, PLC and [Ca2+](i)levels are involved in the stretch-induced signal transduction, whereas PLD plays apparently no role. The stretch-induced rise in [Ca2+](i)in cardiomyocytes is most probably caused by [Ca2+](i)influx through L-type Ca2+ channels and stretch-activated channels, leading to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ -release from the SR via the ryanodine receptor.