Carotenoid content, physicochemical, and sensory qualities of deep-fried carrot chips as affected by dehydration/rehydration, antioxidant, and fermentation.

Journal of agricultural and food chemistry

PubMedID: 11453759

Sulaeman A, Keeler L, Taylor SL, Giraud DW, Driskell JA. Carotenoid content, physicochemical, and sensory qualities of deep-fried carrot chips as affected by dehydration/rehydration, antioxidant, and fermentation. J Agric Food Chem. 2001;49(7):3253-61.
Carrot slices were subjected to one of the following experiments prior to deep-frying: (A) dehydration/rehydration, (B) soaking in different antioxidants, and (C) fermentation with/without blanching. There were no significant differences (P > or = 0.05) in carotenoid contents among carrot chips treated with/without dehydration. Soaking in sodium metabisulfite resulted in the highest carotenoid content and lightness (L), redness (a), and yellowness (b) values among the antioxidant treatments. Fermentation without blanching significantly decreased (P < 0.05) carotenoid content, vitamin A activity, and fat content. Dehydration and fermentation with blanching significantly increased (P < 0.05) the lightness (L), redness (a), and yellowness (b) values of the chips. Dehydration/rehydration, but not antioxidant and fermentation, significantly decreased (P < 0.05) the water activity of the chips. The textural values of carrot chips prepared using sodium metabisulfite, without dehydration and without fermentation, were the lowest among other treatments which suggests the crispiest. Carrot chips prepared using sodium metabisulfite, without dehydration and without fermentation, had the highest carotenoid content and retention, and the highest overall acceptability score.