Effectiveness and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection for intraepithelial neoplasia of the esophagogastric junction.

Chinese medical journal

PubMedID: 24451944

Wen J, Linghu E, Yang Y, Liu Q, Yang J, Wang S, Wang X, Du H, Meng J, Wang H, Lu Z. Effectiveness and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection for intraepithelial neoplasia of the esophagogastric junction. Chin Med J. 2014;127(3):417-22.
BACKGROUND
Endoscopic submucosal dissection of the esophagogastric junction is the most difficult gastric and esophageal dissection procedure. No reports of endoscopic submucosal dissection for Siewert type II carcinoma of the esophagogastric junction have compared the outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection for all three Siewert types of adenocarcinoma. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection for intraepithelial neoplasia of the esophagogastric junction.

METHODS
From October 2008 to June 2013, 73 patients underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection for intraepithelial neoplasia of the esophagogastric junction. The patients were prospectively evaluated regarding the executability of the technique, short-term results of the procedure, en bloc resection rate, curative resection rate, complications and additional treatment after endoscopic submucosal dissection, and follow-up outcomes.

RESULTS
Sixty-eight of the 73 patients (93.2%) underwent en bloc resection; the mean maximum specimen diameter was 33.7 mm. Fifty-seven of 61 patients (93.4%) who underwent curative resection were successfully followed-up for 1.0 to 56.0 months (average, 24.1 months). Local recurrence developed in one patient with high-grade intraepithelial neoplasm. Twelve patients underwent noncurative resection, including lateral resection margin residues in three, vertical resection margin residues in one, signet ring cell carcinoma or undifferentiated adenocarcinoma in four, lymphatic or vessel invasion in one, vertical residual margin residues combined with signet ring cell carcinoma in one, and undifferentiated adenocarcinoma with lymphatic or vessel invasion in two. In the noncurative resection group, one patient was lost to follow-up, seven underwent additional surgery, and the remaining four were periodically followed up; none had local recurrence or distant metastases. The only complication was delayed bleeding in three patients, which was successfully controlled by conservative treatment or endoscopic therapy.

CONCLUSIONS
Endoscopic submucosal dissection is safe and effective for intraepithelial neoplasia of the esophagogastric junction. R0 en bloc resection is possible and can avoid the risk of local recurrence.