Phagocytic killing and antibody response during the first year after tetravalent meningococcal vaccine in complement-deficient and in normal individuals.

Journal of clinical immunology

PubMedID: 10798607

Schlesinger M, Kayhty H, Levy R, Bibi C, Meydan N, Levy J. Phagocytic killing and antibody response during the first year after tetravalent meningococcal vaccine in complement-deficient and in normal individuals. J Clin Immunol. 2000;20(1):46-53.
Seven individuals with late complement component (LCC) deficiency and seven control subjects were vaccinated with tetravalent meningococcal vaccine. The response to vaccination was evaluated by measuring the antibody titer and the phagocyte killing of the bacteria, before, 5-7 weeks, and 12-14 months after vaccination. Prior to vaccination, no phagocytic killing and a low titer of antibody was found in the LCC-deficient group and a low killing (mean of 40-58%, according to the serogroup) in normal controls. The phagocytic killing increased significantly 5-7 weeks after vaccination. However, while in normal controls the phagocytic killing was close to 100% after 5-7 weeks and decreased only slightly during the first year, the mean killing of the various meningococcal subgroups in LCC-deficient individuals was 70-89% and dropped to only 53-71% one year after vaccination. Six weeks after vaccination the mean antimeningococcal antibody titer increased similarly in the sera of LCC-deficient patients and controls. One year after vaccination the controls maintained the high concentration, while the LCC-deficient patients had tendency toward a decrease. In addition, the interpersonal variability of the antibody concentration, both in LCC-deficient individuals and in normal controls, was much higher than the phagocytic killing, with only a very mild increase in some individuals. Thus, it is possible that in spite of adequate increase of antimeningococcal antibody titer after vaccination of LCC-deficient individuals their immunity against the bacteria may not be optimal. Our data show also that phagocytic killing of meningococci is probably a more consistent assay than antibody titer levels for antimeningococcal immunity, especially in LCC-deficient patients.