Low-density lipoprotein subclass distribution pattern and adiposity-associated dyslipidemia in postmenopausal women.

Journal of the American College of Nutrition

PubMedID: 10682872

Maki KC, Davidson MH, Cyrowski MS, Maki AC, Marx P. Low-density lipoprotein subclass distribution pattern and adiposity-associated dyslipidemia in postmenopausal women. J Am Coll Nutr. 2000;19(1):23-30.
OBJECTIVE
A predominance of small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles (subclass pattern B) is associated with increased risk for coronary heart disease and is characterized by elevated triglycerides and depressed high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations. The present analysis was undertaken to assess the impact of LDL subclass distribution pattern and adiposity on serum lipids in postmenopausal women.

METHODS
Anthropometric measurements and fasting lipid data were obtained from 254 postmenopausal women 70 years of age or younger, not receiving sex hormone replacement, who were participating in a clinical trial designed to assess the influence of hormone replacement regimens on coronary heart disease risk markers.

RESULTS
The prevalence of LDL subclass pattern B was 32%. Triglyceride levels were higher and HDL cholesterol lower (both p<0.001) in women with pattern B vs. pattern A, but total and LDL cholesterol levels did not differ. LDL subclass pattern contributed independently to the variance in HDL cholesterol (p<0.001) and log(e) triglyceride (p<0.001) concentrations explained by anthropometric variables (waist circumference or body mass index). Compared to women with LDL subclass pattern A and waist circumference below the median value of 83.0 centimeters, those with pattern B and waist > or =83.0 centimeters had markedly lower HDL cholesterol levels [44.0 (41.6-47.4) vs. 57.2 (54.1-60.3) mg/dL, mean (95% CI)] and increased triglyceride concentrations [geometric mean 147.8 (131.6-165.7) vs. 95.4 (88.2-102.5) mg/dL].

CONCLUSIONS
These data suggest that adiposity and LDL subclass distribution pattern are independent determinants of plasma triglyceride and HDL cholesterol concentrations in postmenopausal women.