Diffusion-weighted MRI in the assessment of split renal function: comparison of navigator-triggered prospective acquisition correction and breath-hold acquisition.

AJR. American journal of roentgenology

PubMedID: 23255749

Li Q, Wu X, Qiu L, Zhang P, Zhang M, Yan F. Diffusion-weighted MRI in the assessment of split renal function: comparison of navigator-triggered prospective acquisition correction and breath-hold acquisition. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2013;200(1):113-9.
OBJECTIVE
The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether prospective acquisition correction (PACE) diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) is superior to conventional breath-hold DWI in assessment of split renal function.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS
Fifty-four subjects underwent coronal breath-hold DWI and PACE DWI with the b value set at 0 and 800 s/mm(2). Isotope renographic glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was used as the reference standard for assessing split renal function. A GFR of 40 mL/min or greater indicated normal and a GFR less than 40 mL/min indicated reduced split renal function. Reduced split renal function was further divided into a mild reduction group (GFR = 20 mL/min) and a moderate-to-severe reduction group (GFR < 20 mL/min). Various comparisons between the imaging methods were conducted.

RESULTS
The signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios of the PACE DW images were greater than those of the breath-hold DW images (p < 0.001). The correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value and GFR was stronger when the ADC was measured with PACE DWI than with breath-hold DWI (p = 0.033). Area under the receiver operator curve (AUC) analysis revealed that PACE DWI (AUC, 0.790 ± 0.045; p < 0.001) but not breath-hold DWI (AUC, 0.616 ± 0.060; p = 0.053) had diagnostic value in predicting a reduction in split renal function. ADC value assessed with PACE DWI was lower in the groups with mild and moderate-to-severe reduction in split renal function than in the group with normal function (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSION
Preliminary results imply that PACE DWI is superior to breath-hold DWI in the assessment of split renal function.